11.09.2018

My Artwork Featured on the FSU College of Fine Arts Website

My artworks are the two directly in front of the person.
I was looking for something on the Florida State University College of Fines Arts website today and was delighted to see two of my works of art featured in the main image on the landing page: http://cfa.fsu.edu/

The image is from the exhibition Artful Journeys: A New Chapter in Art Education held in the William Johnston Building Gallery at FSU, May 2017, in which three of my artworks were exhibited. 

11.03.2018

Family Heirloom Antique Hooked Rugs - Past and Present

  

While cleaning out rooms and closets at my family home that my great grand parents built (c.1908),  I was delighted to find these two hooked rugs (I also found several antique quilts but I'll leave those to another post).  I first found the large one with the black and rose border.  It appears very old and is definitely handmade as evidenced by the use of both black in some parts and brown in other on the outer border, as well as the inner background includes both a cream color as well as grey - the creator obviously used what they had available.  I felt a connection to this rug that was probably made by one of my ancestors.  The backing is burlap, which has frayed and tattered at the edges.  I immediately began to search the internet on how to clean and preserve this antique treasure.  The search piqued my interest in creating hooked rugs.  This all coincided with me having the flu followed by a long recovery time.  Not feeling good enough to be very active, I decided to experiment with rug hooking.   I had actually started a small piece several years ago, but I didn't really know what I was doing and I had not completed it.  I pulled it out, along with my yarn stash and quickly finished it.  

This design is available as a pattern.

Completing the piece was very satisfying so I found some burlap in my fabric stash and started on another design of a bunny (from a photo my daughter had taken).  

This rug is available finished or as a pattern.

I soon finished the bunny and decided to try to adapt part of the floral motif from the large antique rug I had found.  By this time I had ordered monks cloth and a #10 Oxford Punch Needle.  



This design is available as a pattern.

Since creating these first designs inspired by my ancestors' work, I have now created several hooked/punched rugs based on my fine art paintings and have more still in the works.  Finding the antique treasures gave me a connection to my history - it began a creative exploration and conversation of integrating my past and present, and moved my art in a direction I have found very pleasing and rewarding.  Much love and care goes into a hooked/punch rug and I think this is somehow still evidenced in the obvious handmade nature of the work.  This conversation extends to my students and those who purchase my finished pieces and patterns.  I love the idea that when I create a design for rug hooking/punching, my creation is not done.  It is has continued life and evolution through the creative work and family life of others.  And this extends to the future generations of those who hook/punch my designs.  One day, another artist may find the work that was lovingly made by their ancestor and be inspired, like I was, by the love and care that went into making a beautiful yet practical work of art for their family.   
















10.26.2018

Peace - Free Punch Needle Pin/Mini Pattern


Peace begins with each individual.  We all can make a conscious effort to embody and spread peace in our daily lives. Each act of love and kindness, each peaceful interaction with other human beings, animals, and the earth has reverberations.  Anger and strife are easy.  Peace takes work.  Sometimes we need a reminder of this.  Here is a free punch needle pin pattern I am offering as a literal way to experience and spread peace - while creating the needle punch and then by wearing the pin.  No doubt all needlework artists know the individual sense of peace found in time spent on their creations. 
Enjoy!  And please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Here is what you will need:
  • Punch needle and threader (I used a Cameo punch needle with the medium needle on setting 2 with six strands of floss.)
  • Non slip embroidery hoop (Susan Bate's Hoopla or Morgan).  I used a 4 inch hoop.
  • DMC floss
    • 3810 for the word 'peace'
    • 3811 for the background oval
    • B5200 or white for the scalloped edge
  • Fabric - weaver's cloth or similar fabric suitable for punch needle (If you don't have weaver's cloth, test out fabrics you already have - I have found cotton quilting fabric, twill, and linen can work.) 
  • Small piece of wool or felt in coordinating color
  • Scissors
  • Permanent marker
  • Elmer's or Fabric Glue
  • Stiff brush
  • Bar pin - glue or sew (if sewing - you will need thread and needle)   

Step 1.  Adjust pattern size on your screen to desired size.  The original design is 1 1/4 x 3 inches but will appear different on different screens.  My finished piece once stitched and glued on wool backing is 1 3/4 x 3 1/2 inches.   

Step 2.  Hold or tape fabric on your screen and trace the design onto fabric with permanent marker.   
  


Step 3.  Once you have traced your design onto fabric, place fabric in no slip embroidery hoop and pull tight.

Step 4.  Punch design with six strands of embroidery floss.  I recommend punching the word 'peace' first.  

Step 5.  Once you have finished punching the design, take it out of the embroidery hoop and gather your supplies.  Note - some needle artists like to over-dye their needle punch work with coffee to achieve and antique look.  If you desire an antique look, over-dye your embroidery piece with coffee at this point and let dry before going to next step.  


Step 6.  Brush glue onto back of embroidery and all the way out to the outer line of the design (the outer oval shape).  Let dry.

Step 7.  Once the glue is dry, first cut along the outer oval line of the design.
Step 8.  Then trace this shape onto the back of the wool/felt.  Put wool/felt aside.
Step 9.  Carefully cut the fabric away from the embroidery design along the edge of the scallops.  Try to not cut any of the floss/loops.  




 Step 10.  Place trimmed embroidery piece onto wool/felt.  Check to see if the oval you traced is large enough to create a border around the scallops.  If it is just right, go ahead and cut the oval shape out of the wool/felt.  It you want your border to be larger, cut slightly outside the oval to create the desired size.  Don't worry, if the traced oval is showing on your wool/felt because it will be on the back of the pin and will not show.   






 Step 11.  Now glue trimmed embroidery piece to wool/felt and let dry. Your piece should look like the one in the picture above. 

Step 12.  Now you are ready to either sew or glue the bar pin onto the back of your piece. 

Congratulations!  You are finished and can now wear your pin or give it as a gift to spread peace.  I would love to see your finished creation! 
 


Finishing Needle Punch Ornaments


Baby Christmas Wreath - available as a cloth, paper, or digital pattern 


Pink Polka Dot Christmas Tree - available as a cloth, paper, or digital pattern

When the air begins to cool in early Fall I start thinking of the upcoming holidays.  This year
I have designed several needle punch holiday ornaments.  They are available as cloth, paper, or digital patterns in my Etsy shop.  (Some of these designs are also available as hand-painted needlepoint canvases.
There are many ways to finish needle punch ornaments.  Below you will find instructions for several methods.  

Finishing with wool felt (sew method) 
What you need: Piece of wool/felt large enough to cover back of ornament, thread, needle, scissors, optional - pen or chalk for tracing, iron, pins.
What to to:
  1. Once you have completed punching your design, remove it from your hoop or frame. 
  2. Cut around the edge of the ornament, leaving ¼ -½ inch of the base fabric.
  3. Press fabric onto back of ornament with iron.
  4. Place ornament on top of wool/felt with ornament design facing up. Decide if you want the wool to show from the front or not. (If you want it to show, you will leave 1/8 to ¼ inch when you trace and/cut the wool/felt into the shape of the ornament.) 
  5. Either trace your ornament onto the wool (remember to leave ¼ to 1/8 inch from edge of ornament if you want wool/felt to show from front), or hold it tightly to the fabric with your fingers.
  6. Cut the wool/felt into the shape of the ornament.
  7. Either pin or hold ornament and wool/felt in place.  Using thread and needle, sew from back to attach wool/felt to ornament. Be sure to catch/sew through the fabric you folded/pressed in to back of ornament.
  8. To make a hanger for the ornament, cut a small strip of wool/felt to desired width and length and fold in half.  I like to make a short hanger that is about ¼ inch wide and 2-3 inches long. I then attach a metal hook.  You can make a long hanger if you don’t want to use a hook.  For a short hanger cut a 1 ½ - 3 inch long piece of wool.  If you want a longer hanger, cut a 6 - 8 inch long piece of wool. 
  9. Sew the hanger onto the back of the ornament.
Finishing with wool felt (no sew method) 
What you need:  Glue (Elmer’s, Fabric, Aileen’s, Lineco (Acid Free), or Mod Podge), small stiff brush, piece of wool/felt large enough to cover back of ornament, scissors, wax paper or other paper to protect work surface, optional - pen or chalk for tracing.
What to to:
  1. Once you have completed punching your design, remove it from your hoop or frame. 
  2. Place wax or other protective paper onto work surface.  
  3. Lay the ornament front facing down onto your work surface. 
  4. Brush glue onto back of ornament and out to ¼ inch or more onto fabric away from the punched thread.  Note - some artists prefer to not apply glue to the actual punched area and only apply glue the ¼ inch of fabric at edge of punched design. Let dry.  
  5. Once glue has dried, cut along edge of fabric close to punched design.  I like to cut almost right up to the decorative thread or you can leave 1/8-¼ inch if you’d like for the fabric to show from the front of the finished ornament.  
  6. Place ornament on top of wool felt with ornament design facing up. Decide if you want the wool to show from the front or not. If you want it to show, leave 1/8 to ¼ inch when you trace and/cut the wool into the shape of the ornament.  
  7. Either trace your ornament onto the wool/felt (remember to leave ¼ to 1/8 inch from edge of ornament if you want wool/felt to show from front), or hold it tightly to the fabric with your fingers.  
  8. Cut the wool/felt into the shape of the ornament. 
  9. To make a hanger for the ornament, cut a small strip of wool to desired width and length and fold in half.  I like to make a short hanger that is about ¼ inch wide and 2-3 inches long. I then attach a metal hook or you can make a long hanger if you don’t want to use a hook.  For a short hanger cut a 1 ½ - 3 inch long piece of wool.  If you want a longer hanger, cut a 6 - 8 inch long piece of wool. 
  10. Put glue onto the wool/felt, fold hanger and place between ornament and felt, then gently press the punched ornament on top.  If you find your glue is not holding the two pieces together, you can gently press it while it dries by laying a book or two on top. Let dry. 
Finishing with cardboard and fabric (no sew method)
What you need:  Piece of coordinating fabric and thin cardboard large enough to cover back of ornament, 4-8 inches of coordinating ribbon, glue (Elmer’s, Fabric, Aileen’s, Lineco (Acid Free), or Mod Podge), small stiff brush, scissors, wax paper or other paper to protect work surface, optional - pen or chalk for tracing.
What to to:
  1. Once you have completed punching your design, remove it from your hoop or frame. 
  2. Place wax or other protective paper onto work surface.  
  3. Lay the ornament front facing down onto your work surface. 
  4. Brush glue onto back of ornament and out to ¼ inch or more onto fabric away from the punched thread.  Note - some artists prefer to not apply glue to the actual punched area and only apply glue onto ¼ inch of fabric at edge of punched design. Let dry. 
  5. Once glue has dried, cut along edge of fabric close to punched design.  I like to cut almost right up to the decorative thread or you can leave 1/8-¼ inch if you’d like for the fabric to show from the front of the finished ornament.
  6. Place ornament on top of cardboard with ornament design facing up. Decide whether you want your ornament to have a clean edge or if you want the coordinating fabric to show a little from the front. If you want it to show, leave 1/8 to ¼ inch when you trace and/cut the cardboard into the shape of the ornament. Otherwise, trace directly around the ornament onto the cardboard. 
  7. Cut the cardboard into the shape of the ornament.  
  8. On the backside of the cardboard shape, glue the coordinating fabric and fold edge over to front of cardboard and glue into place.  Let dry.
  9. Put glue onto the cardboard piece.  Fold coordinating ribbon in half, then glue ends onto cardboard/fabric piece so that it will be between ornament and backing cardboard/fabric.  Now gently press punched piece onto top of cardboard/fabric piece. You can gently press it while it dries by laying a book or two on top. Let dry.

Finishing with glue and paint (no sew method)
What you need:  Acrylic craft paint in a coordinating color, 4-8 inches of coordinating ribbon, glue (Elmer’s, Fabric, Aileen’s, Lineco (Acid Free), or Mod Podge), small stiff brush, scissors, wax paper or other paper to protect work surface.
What to to:
  1. Once you have completed punching your design, remove it from your hoop or frame. 
  2. Turn your piece over so that the back side is facing up.  On the back side, brush with enough glue to cover and out to ¼ inch into the fabric at the edge of the punched ornament.  Let dry.
  3. Once glue has dried, cut along edge of fabric close to punched design.  I like to cut almost right up to the thread or you can leave 1/8 inch if you’d like for the based fabric to show from the front of the finished ornament.
  4. Paint back of punched ornament with acrylic craft paint. Let dry.
  5. Fold coordinating ribbon in half and and glue ends to back of ornament. Let dry.

If you are using any of the no sew methods above, you may find these images helpful:

Apply glue to back of needle punch ornament and 1/4 inch of base fabric.
Once glue is dry, cut fabric close to punched design.
  
This image shows the back of an ornament after I glued on the wool/felt backing and hanger.














8.28.2018

Peace Offering


Peace Offering    12 x 12 inches   egg tempera and ink on paper mounted on wood

Peace Offering   8 x 8 inches   hand-painted needlepoint canvas   
My painting, Peace Offering, was selected for the 2018 NAEA (National Art Education Association) Member Exhibition that will be showcased in the NAEA Studio & Gallery from October 1, 2018 through January 4, 2019 in Alexandria, Virginia.  I began this painting using black to express my profound sadness for the victims of the Parkland school shootings.  Seeking harmony and hope, I added the camellia.  Frustrations encountered in the process were reminders of what art can offer individuals and society - a safe space to develop patience, perseverance, transformation, and compassion.  This painting was created as part of my doctoral dissertation research.  To expand this idea further I created a hand-painted needlepoint canvas to collaborate with others to find and spread peace and compassion.  The needlepoint canvas is available in my Etsy needlework shop.  

   

4.11.2018

Virginia Peony Progression



I've been working on this peony from an image I took in Virginia after my workshop there last spring.  I'm hoping to finish it before my next workshop there on Mother's Day weekend.  Below are images of its progress. 











4.01.2018

Botanical Watercolor Painting Workshop

I recently presented the workshop Art + Science: Watercolor Botanical Illustration at the NAEA convention in Seattle.  The basic concepts are covered in the slide presentation below.Click here to link to workshop resources.

For those of you who took my workshop, thank you!  I'd love to hear from you either via the comments section below or at paigesmithwyatt@gmail.com  Please feel free to post images of your work as well.

Watercolor Meditation Explorations



I recently presented the workshop Watercolor Meditations: Art-making for Self Care at the NAEA convention in Seattle.  The basic concepts are covered in the slide presentation below.   Click here to link to workshop resources. 

If you are interested in this practice, I'd love to hear from you either via the comments section below or at paigesmithwyatt@gmail.com  Please feel free to post images of your explorations in watercolor meditations as well.



3.06.2018

Watercolor Workshops and a Presentation at NAEA


I'll be teaching three watercolor workshops and a presentation at the National Art Education Association Conference in Seattle, Washington.

Watercolor Meditations: Art-making for Self Care (Studio Workshop)                     
Thursday, 3/22/2018    4:00:00 PM - 5:50:00 PM
Click here to link to workshop resources.
Art + Science: Watercolor Botanical Illustration (Studio Workshop)                              
Friday, 3/23/2018    8:00:00 AM - 9:50:00 AM
Click here to link to workshop resources.
Unique Beauty Art (Studio Workshop) - Co-presented with Jorge Bustamante            
Saturday, 3/24/2018       1:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Click here to link to workshop resources.
Old Tricks for New Teachers (skills toolbox) - Co-presented with Cindy Jessup and Jorge Bustamante  
Saturday, 3/24/2108     11-11:50 AM
Click here to link to workshop resources.

I welcome comments on the above workshops and presentations:


Watercolor Workshops at Beverley Street Studio School



I will be teaching two workshops at the Beverley Street Studio School in Staunton, Virginia on Mother's Day weekend.  I will give a lecture/mini workshop Friday evening and a two day floral painting workshop on Saturday and Sunday.  Below is more information from the BSSS website:

WATERCOLOR MEDITATIONS: PAIGE SMITH-WYATT


Spring 2018
New Workshop
Lecture and hands-on workshop: Location: VanDerVeer Studio
Friday, May 11; 6-8pm
Free and open to the public
Watercolor is the perfect painting medium to help you maintain a healthy well-being and balance. It flows freely, mingles colors together, and becomes your partner in a creative exploration. Paige will teach you how to use watercolor painting for self-care and well-being. She will also help you find ways to relieve stress and prevent burn-out, and Paige will reveal how she used watercolor for meditation in small watercolor doodles and large completed works of art. Through demonstrations and hands-on practice with the techniques presented, you will learn how to use watercolor as meditation and ways to incorporate this into your daily life. No prior experience with watercolor painting required. www.pswyatt.com

GIVE LIFE AND ENERGY TO FLORAL WATERCOLOR: PAIGE SMITH-WYATT


Spring 2018
New Workshop
Beginner/Intermediate: Location: VanDerVeer Studio
Saturday & Sunday, May 12-13; 9:30am-4pm (1/2 hr lunch break)
TUITION: Members: $185; Nonmembers: $215
Learn more about using the unique qualities of transparent watercolors to paint flowers so the depictions have a greater sense of light and life. Paige will show you how to use photographic references by demonstrating and working with you one-on-one. Concepts of art and design will be discussed, and Paige will encourage you to follow your own unique path to completing paintings, with the goal of instilling enthusiasm and confidence.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions: paigesmithwyatt@gmail.com

To sign up for this workshop, contact the Beverley Street Studio School in Staunton, Virginia at:  (540) 886-8636     Email: bssschool@verizon.net 

My Artwork Featured on the FSU College of Fine Arts Website

My artworks are the two directly in front of the person. I was looking for something on the Florida State University College of Fines Ar...